Using Phrases as a Camera Lens

Howdy, Monarchs!

Once you fully understand basic sentence structure (simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences), you’re ready to start zooming in on different details by adding phrases to your sentences.

There are three types of phrases you can use to zoom in on specific details within a sentence: appositive, participial, and absolute. Watch the video below to learn about the differences between these three types of phrases. Take Cornell notes as you watch the video. You will need to know the differences between clauses and phrases, as well as the differences between appositive, participial, and absolute phrases, and also how to use commas and phrases together to avoid run-on sentences. Continued

Priority List – Week of 8/29 – 9/2

English 9 – Periods 2, 6 and 7

Essential Question: How can our words, both written and verbal, affect others?

Screen Shot 2016-08-29 at 10.03.56 AMMonday, 8/29: Read “Desiderata” on page seventeen of the green textbooks. As you read, keep a dialectical journal of quotes related to the essential question in the dialectical journal section of your notebook.

Tuesday and Wednesday, 8/30-31: Read “The Giant’s House” on page nine of the green textbooks. As you read, keep a dialectical journal of quotes related to the essential question in the dialectical journal section of your notebook. Homework: Write an eleven-sentence paragraph that answers the essential question, “How can our words, both written and verbal, affect others?” You must use evidence from “Desiderata” and “The Giant’s House” to support your claims. 

Thursday and Friday, 9/1-2: Embedding evidence notes – revise your paragraph to correctly embed evidence into your notes.

English 10 – Periods 3 and 4

Essential Question: How can you make your sentences more detailed and more specific?

Monday, 8/29: Work with a partner or small group to make instructional posters that teach different parts of a sentence. Your instructional poster must have the following criteria:

  • A visual scaffold showing students how to use your assigned component.
  • Necessary definitions using student-friendly language.
  • At least two examples of your component being used correctly.
  • At least one example of your component being used incorrectly.
  • A “Misconception Alert” that corrects common mistakes.

Tuesday and Wednesday, 8/30-8/31: Continue learning how to write interesting sentences by taking Cornell notes on phrases. Watch the video below for your notes.

Once you’ve finished taking notes, take the time to chunk, question, summarize, and highlight your notes. It may be helpful to check out this post on phrases. Your exit-ticket is to write seven sentences:

  1. One sentence with an appositive phrase
  2. One sentence with a participial phrase
  3. One sentence with an absolute phrase
  4. One simple sentence (with no phrases)
  5. One compound sentence (with no phrases)
  6. One complex sentence (with no phrases)
  7. One compound-complex sentence (with no phrases)

Thursday and Friday, 9/1-9/2: Apply your understanding of basic sentence structure and phrases by analyzing sentences from “Tepeyac” on page 104 in the purple textbooks. Then, mimic Cisneros’ style by writing a sentence about your bedroom.

Everything You Need to Know About Cornell Notes

posted in: Freshman, Sophomores, Students | 0

Hey Monarchs!

Today we’re learning all about Cornell Notes! There are three things I expect you to do today: set up the Cornell Notes template in your notebook, take Cornell Notes on the merits of Cornell Notes, and complete the quiz and summary sections of your Cornell Notes on Cornell Notes. Continued

Mandala Project Directions

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Happy Friday, Monarchs!

Today we’re starting our mandala project, which includes an essay, a visual, and a presentation in front of the class. The essay is worth 50 points, and the presentation is worth another 50 points, so the entire project is worth a total of 100 points. You will have all period on Monday, 8/15 to finish your mandala and your essay, and presentations will be August 16th for 2nd, 4th, and 6th, and on August 17th for 3rd and 7th. Continued

Daily Lesson Plan Checklist

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When faced with the stress of planning new lessons with limited time, it’s easy to plan lessons that are neither efficient nor effective. Be mindful of the trap of “fake teaching” (walking like a teacher and talking like a teacher without thinking like a teacher) by reviewing your lesson plans with these seven reminders:

  1. Start with a learning objective. This will help you to keep the focus on student learning, rather than on filling the period with activities/lessons/notes that may not actually target the learning goals.
  1. Consider how you will organize the new material and content for the students, not just what material you’ll “go through.” How will you introduce that video or that text or that concept to prime students for learning and making progress towards the learning objective? How will this also promote student engagement? Remember: great lessons have less to do with the content, and more to do with the presentation of the concept. This includes build up, delivery, and the “so what?” at the end of the lesson.

Continued

Kid-Friendly Analysis: Making Analysis Accessible For All Students

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Last year, I left my comfortable position teaching seventh-grade language arts at a small, rural middle school in New Mexico teach high school English and AP Literature to juniors and seniors closer to home. The first few weeks in my new position were challenging, not just because I was teaching at a new school in a new district, but because I was also teaching students at the end of their high school career instead of at the beginning of their middle school adventure. I had to reevaluate my understanding of the English curriculum, especially since the concepts I had to introduce to my middle schoolers were now skills I had to strengthen within my seniors. After writing “too much plot summary!” on yet another student paper, I realized that analysis was especially challenging for my seniors. Thus began my analytical adventure of analyzing the concept of analysis!

What is Analysis Anyway?

What is analysis? Take a moment to seriously consider the definition to this word used so frequently in the world of education, it’s become white noise to our students. Jot down your definition of analysis so you can refer back to it later.

Plot Summary vs. Plot Interpretation vs. Literary Analysis

I don’t know about you, but when I have to write “too much plot summary” on an essay for the umpteenth time in one night, I feel an Continued

Quills and Thrills Week Fifteen

Happy Tuesday, Quillers and Thrillers!

If you are new to Quills and Thrills this week, you need to turn in your Ten Commandments of Digital Citizenship pledge and signed permission form before you can publish anything online on behalf of the club.

Don’t have the Ten Commandments of Digital Citizenship permission form signed yet? No worries, you can still Continued

Quills and Thrills Week Fourteen

Happy Tuesday, Quillers and Thrillers!

If you are new to Quills and Thrills this week, you need to turn in your Ten Commandments of Digital Citizenship pledge and signed permission form before you can publish anything online on behalf of the club.

Don’t have the Ten Commandments of Digital Citizenship permission form Continued

Rock PARCC With These 10 Easy Steps

posted in: English Toolbox, Freshman, Students | 0

The English PARCC Assessment is right around the corner, Jags!

While everything Mr. Rasberry and I have taught you this year has prepared you for this important assessment, we would like to teach you some test taking strategies so you can make sure you ROCK the PARCC!

Before jumping into the steps, you should know the general layout of the PARCC assessment.

  • There are three units total, and you will have a two-hour class period to complete each section.
    • Unit 1: Literary Analysis Task
    • Unit 2: Research Simulation Task
    • Unit 3: Narrative Writing Task
  • Each section will consist of multiple text passages, multiple choice questions, technology-enhanced questions, and an essay question.

Last year, the English Department and I worked hard to break down the PARCC assessment to understand it on a structural level. Our hard work paid off when we made a critical discovery: the multiple-choice questions are designed to lead you to information that will help you write your essay. This means that Continued

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